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StellaBlue
Feb 18, 2019 (07:11 PM) Reply | Quote 


       
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Country: Canada
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I love how you phrased that, that quitting smoking is like a "natural progression of my recovery." That's exactly how it felt for me, too.  Like now that I've tasted some freedom, why wouldn't I continue walking toward it?  Smoking is antithetical to freedom, and so came the decision to turn my attention to quitting.  A hop, skip, and a jump (....and around 2 years of trying and failing!) later, here I am two days shy of 8 months smoke-free. I consider this a real milestone in my recovery.  And it has become my new normal to walk straight into the building and just give a few heys or hugs on my way by.  No need to huddle around the butt can to feel included, and I don't feel I am missing out in any way.  I used to get a lot of my recovery insight around the smoking circle, and I worried that I wouldn't be able to access that kind of openness and atmosphere without smoking.  I was wrong.  If I'm at a meeting, then I'm surrounded by recovery and opportunities to seek recovery, whether I'm holding a smoke or not.  I now feel a bit silly that I once thought quitting smoking would oust me from the good stuff.  It's been the opposite.

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Eliza
Feb 18, 2019 (12:04 PM) Reply | Quote 


       
Posts: 8
Joined: Feb 06, 2019
Last Visit: Feb 18, 2019
1122858

13
Smoke Free Days

169
Cigarettes Not Smoked

£90.13
Amount Saved

Days: 0 Hours: 20
Minutes: 51 Seconds: 55

Life Gained

Hey Stella,
 
I am still with it! Day 12 smoke free! Yippee! 
 
Thank you SO much for replying, it's so reassuring and inspirational to see someone else in recovery overcome smoking. Good advice - I too have started to go straight inside meetings and leave immediately, and all my smoking friends have been very supportive.  I'm trying to view stopping smoking as a natural progression of my recovery, rather than a punishment or a test. It makes sense that seeing as I won't consume any mind-altering substances that I know are dangerous for me, that I also wouldn't smoke.
 
Congratulations to you on your recovery and for stopping smoking. Really inspirational for me to see someone else in a similar position to me on here. 
 
xxx 

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Timbo637
Feb 11, 2019 (06:14 PM) Reply | Quote 


       
Posts: 535
Joined: Dec 03, 2013
Last Visit: Feb 16, 2019

Gender: Male
Country: United States
Occupation: Laboratory technician
Hobbies: Computer nerd, bird watching
1116861

1937
Smoke Free Days

42,614
Cigarettes Not Smoked

$11,718.85
Amount Saved

Days: 379 Hours: 1
Minutes: 31 Seconds: 21

Life Gained

Hi Rachy77,
 Welcome to the stop smoking center. Struggling on day five, that's why the first week is called hell week.  It can be tough for sure. Hang in there though. At 5 days you no longer have any nicotine left in your system and your mind is doing everything it can to get you to go back to smoking. It "needs its fix", that nasty addicting drug called nicotine. Believe it or not it's all mental now. The physical part of your quit is over. The cravings you are feeling now are caused by nicotine receptors in the brain. They need their "fix" that you took away from them by quitting. When suddenly deprived of the nicotine, the brain will no longer release the "feel-good" hormone dopamine which your body has grown accustomed to. Do whatever you can to keep yourself busy and not have time to think about smoking. Try not to think about the future right now either. Just concentrate on the present, the here and now. You have to be stronger than the urge in order to beat this drug addiction. It's your life and you are in back in charge of it now, not the nicotine. Hang on, it WILL get easier. 
 When you get an urge, get up and go for a walk if you can. Fresh air helps. Sip some cold water, munch on a fruit or vegetable, or if you have to, chips or pretzels. Don't worry about gaining weight in the beginning, you can tackle that issue AFTER you beat this addiction to nicotine. Smoking is worse for you than gaining weight. Get on here and write a message in one of these forums. By the time you are done, the urge should have subsided enough to be more manageable. Have you went through the "my program" at the top of the page yet? There are some good tips and hints in there that can help you on your quit journey.
 Whatever you do, please don't give in to the urge. You can do this, it's just very hard at times, but WELL worth it in the end.
Stay strong.
 
Not One Puff Ever
 

Tim

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Rachy77
Feb 11, 2019 (04:47 PM) Reply | Quote 


       
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Last Visit: Feb 12, 2019
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Day 5 and struggling

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StellaBlue
Feb 11, 2019 (09:13 AM) Reply | Quote 


       
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Joined: Jun 25, 2018
Last Visit: Feb 18, 2019

Country: Canada
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Hi Eliza, congrats on starting your quit!  Are you still with it?  I wanted to reply to your post here because I went through the same thing - I am a member of NA, and the smoking culture was really hard for me to get around.  What eventually worked for me was showing up just before the meeting started, being vocal that I was quitting in order to motivate me to stay inside during breaks, and leaving right after the meeting ended.  I am now able to socialize and stick around like usual, but for a while I simply had to separate myself from the scene and sort of cold-turkey quit the smoking circle stuff.  Today, I now have my other non-smoker buddies in the meetings that I hang out with there, but I'm also no longer triggered if I do go and chat with the smokers (although to be honest, now that I am a non-smoker, I no longer have much interest in the smoking section - I talk to those folks inside but don't feel a need to linger around their smoke outside).  I have also noticed that others who try to quit, but try to remain part of the smoking circles, generally end up relapsing and going back to smoking.  I have no seen that happen a number of times since I quit, and for me i don't have any interest in risking it.  Just like I do not belong in a bar anymore, I also don't belong in a circle of smokers now.  You are who you hang out with, right?  It took a bit of time and diligence, but I no longer associate meetings with smoking, so that entire stressor has been removed from my quit and from my life.  But there were many nights in the beginning where I basically shouted over my shoulder as I ran away, "Sorry-can't-chat-I'm-trying-not-to-smoke-and-I-can't-be-around-this-right-now!!!!"  

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Timbo637
Feb 09, 2019 (04:23 PM) Reply | Quote 


       
Posts: 535
Joined: Dec 03, 2013
Last Visit: Feb 16, 2019

Gender: Male
Country: United States
Occupation: Laboratory technician
Hobbies: Computer nerd, bird watching
1114857

1937
Smoke Free Days

42,614
Cigarettes Not Smoked

$11,718.85
Amount Saved

Days: 379 Hours: 1
Minutes: 31 Seconds: 21

Life Gained

Hi Eliza,
  Sorry I missed this post the other day. "I am getting the strongest cravings when I am asked to do a difficult task at work. I am having to learn new ways to process stress." Deep breathing really helps to deal with the stress. Slowly inhale a deep breath through your nose, hold a few seconds then slowly exhale through your mouth like you are blowing out a candle. Do this a few times and you'll be amazed at how calmer you will feel. Just don't do it too fast or you might get light headed. The best part is you can do this ANY time ANY where and it really does help.  "I am a sober alcoholic, and have been amazed at how AA helped me to achieve sobriety." Oh wow, giving up smoking AND drinking at the same time? You must have a great quantity of willpower stored up. Wish you the best! "I'm concerned that when I next go to an AA meeting, I'll be really triggered to smoke because all of my friends there smoke and it's usually what I'd do before and after the meeting. Any tips or advice?" Be sure and explain to your friends about your smoking quit journey and the triggers involved with the AA meetings, and I would hope they will understand you wanting to distance yourself from them for awhile until you are back in control of your urges. Maybe if you get lucky, you might get some of your AA buddies to give up smoking too once they see you on your path to freedom from the addiction!! Would't that be grand. 
Stay strong Eliza.
 
Not One Puff Ever
 
 

Tim

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Eliza
Feb 07, 2019 (07:03 AM) Reply | Quote 


       
Posts: 8
Joined: Feb 06, 2019
Last Visit: Feb 18, 2019
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13
Smoke Free Days

169
Cigarettes Not Smoked

£90.13
Amount Saved

Days: 0 Hours: 20
Minutes: 51 Seconds: 55

Life Gained

Hi, 
 
I stopped smoking yesterday and I feel very relieved. I am experiencing quite strong cravings, but nothing that can't be solved by walking around or making a cup of tea. I am getting the strongest cravings when I am asked to do a difficult task at work. I am having to learn new ways to process stress.
 
I am a sober alcoholic, and have been amazed at how AA helped me to achieve sobriety. When I wanted to stop smoking, I knew that I was going to need a community to help me just like I had with my drinking. I hope that this can be my community of support. Every time I have a craving but I can't leave my desk and walk around, I come and read these forums for motivation and inspiration. 
 
I'm really serious about quitting and I'm concerned that when I next go to an AA meeting, I'll be really triggered to smoke because all of my friends there smoke and it's usually what I'd do before and after the meeting. Any tips or advice? I'm able to avoid all other smokers in my life, but I have to go to AA meetings in order to maintain my sobriety. 
 
Thank you in advance, 
 
 
E xx 

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