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StellaBlue
Jul 30, 2018 (11:00 AM) Reply | Quote 


        
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Joined: Jun 25, 2018
Last Visit: Oct 17, 2018

Country: Canada
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Yep, I totally agree.  And the feeling that I was gaining weight absolutely caused me to relapse - several times - over the past 1.5 years of quit attempts.  I would tell myself, "I'd rather have the problem of smoking than the problem of gaining weight," and that was enough to send me to the local Mac's.  Especially since in the earlier quit attempts, I did find myself using food to cope with nicotine cravings, so the weight gain was a real, present concern.  I feel I've moved beyond that for this quit, and I have honed my ability to deal with cigarette cravings without bingeing on food. I have also decided to keep some perspective, in that even if I do gain 5 pounds or whatever, that that can be a temporary little blip on the radar of my life, versus spending another decade smoking just to avoid a few pounds.  I can work on losing a few pounds any time I want, but it seems the stars all need to align perfectly in order for me to stick to a quit.  I am sticking to this quit so far and I'm not willing to sacrifice it to my vanity!  I think, also, that no one cares if I gain a few pounds.  But many people care if I reek of stale cigarettes.  Vanity can be used for good OR for evil!

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BiscoffB
Jul 30, 2018 (10:15 AM) Reply | Quote 


       
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Joined: Jul 29, 2018
Last Visit: Jul 30, 2018
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Oh my gosh that’s so funny, indeed we do have a lot of similarities!!! ;). That’s awesome that you’re also doing something for yourself as a reward. I thought at first I was being vain, but I did actually find a couple articles by doctors who think that doing something like that/cosmetic can actually impact your long term success in quitting. And teeth/your smile is important for confidence, so that’s a good one to choose. As far as weight gain, I am just going to try my best to add in a few extra workouts and try to be more conscious of what I eat. If you get braces, that may actually be enough alone to ward off weight gain because it makes your teeth sore lol, and the adults I know who have gotten braces actually lost a good amount of weight! Anyway- not like it’s the most important thing in life but for those of us who are really self conscious about it, I do think it’s important to know yourself and your weaknesses and have a plan to address it to keep it from being a reason to fall back into smoking. Even if it does mean a little gain (ugh), I guess I’d rather go through it now then in 5-10 years from now when I may not bounce back as easily anyway, another thing to consider. Can’t keep finding excuses to put it off as eventually all the other negatives of smoking are going to catch up!!!

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StellaBlue
Jul 30, 2018 (09:20 AM) Reply | Quote 


        
Posts: 100
Joined: Jun 25, 2018
Last Visit: Oct 17, 2018

Country: Canada
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Biscoff B, my soul sister!  Well, maybe not entirely, but we do have a lot of similarities. I am 35.  I am a shortie (5'1). I am also concerned about weight gain, because I am familiar with the problem that 5 pounds looks like 10-15 on me. I run and am fit and healthy.... except for the smoking. Embarrassment is a big part of this quit - I'm tired of being embarrassed or feeling shame around my family because I am the only smoker.  And the final similarity?  I decided that I was going to pursue a cosmetic reward for quitting - I am fixing my teeth!  Around 30 days, I went and put the wheels in motion.  I am getting braces, after years of wanting them, and after years of saying no because I smoke (as I was actively ruining my teeth, as well as spending all "slush fund" money on cigarettes). Now the promise of braces is keeping me motivated, because there is no way I am forking over that kind of money just to have brown, weirdly-shaped stains all over my teeth.  And there is no way I'm taking on a $200 monthly ortho payment on top of a $200/month cigarette habit. I can only have one, and I choose my teeth this time! I hope you stick around here. I love reading quit journeys in the archives and I want to read yours, now, too :)

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BiscoffB
Jul 30, 2018 (07:41 AM) Reply | Quote 


       
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Joined: Jul 29, 2018
Last Visit: Jul 30, 2018
963794

Hello everyone!
 
I’m on day 3 of being smoke free.
I’m 35 and have been smoking 3 years this time. I previously smoked two times in my life anywhere between 1-2 years, then quit those 2 prior times for a period of 5-6 years each. The times I have re-started smoking have been around major life events and extreme stress. I have had a much harder time this time, just making the decision that I WANT to quit. I haven’t really felt the health affects yet so it’s tough to focus on long term health versus the short term reward. But my biggest motivation is my daughter who is now 10, and I am sick of having to hide it and lie to my own family. She’s old enough to know what that smell is. And I want to be alive to watch her grow up, get married, have her own kids someday. I also am sick of the wedge it’s put between my husband and I. I don’t want him to have to think twice as to whether it’s “safe” to kiss me or if he’s going to be kissing an ashtray. I’m tired of being embarrassed of the smell of my car and always wondering whether I’ve covered up the scent on myself enough or whether other people think I reek of cigarettes.  I’m also very physically fit for the most part, I workout 5 days a week including running, but smoking has definitely put a damper on my running. 
This weekend has been harder than I thought it would be. I have been low on energy, and sometimes my thoughts get consumed with whether or not I should quit another day because I just really want one more.  I’m doing this cold turkey just like the prior two times. I do have some Zyban, which I tried for 2 days a week ago and then stopped bc I hated the way it made me feel foggy. I was also worried seeing stories about people having a hard time stopping Wellbutrin, so I got scared that I would be one of those people and end up on one more thing i’d have a hard time quitting.  Anyone here used Zyban and have issues or no issues stopping? How long did other people take it just for smoking cessation? (12 weeks?)
I am nervous about going back to work today which is when I usually smoke the most.
I am extremely nervous about gaining weight, especially because I’m only 5 feet tall so even 5 pounds makes a difference on my frame. This may sound weird, but one part of my stay-quit plan is to get a cosmetic procedure  done about 2 months after my quit date. The reason for this is to provide a short term goal/reward, and help keep me from slipping. You cannot have ANY nicotine/smoking at least 2 weeks before and 2 weeks after the procedure so that your skin heals properly. So for me, it’s a bonus motivator/reason to continue to refrain from smoking, while giving me something to be excited about that I otherwise couldn’t do if I was still a smoker. 
Anyway, I was hoping to find support in this site through the experiences of others to help keep me going, especially in these first few days which for me are the absolute hardest.  Thank you and good luck to everyone else in the same boat. 

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